sequences ~ frequencies

It has crossed my mind that coming across a poem on a trail, or even returning to it — the in/frequency of this — could be similar to the coming across/returning to poetry books, poems, on bookshelves. They, too, are placed somewhere until they are come-across (a-gaining), re-found, or remembered.

Recently, I planted a sequence of 5 poems by Linda Russo. This was a long overdue planting; they had overwintered in my garage as I dithered about where to plant them, what type of habitat, what sort of exposure (species, including human), in what season, how far away, among other things. I wondered whether I should spread them out along a trail or align them so that whatever encountered them could move easily from one poem to the other; or perhaps they should be dispersed in such a way to include singular encounters, or a sequence that came together if only by the happenstance of noticing or looking-and-finding — between trips, or between moments in the same journey.

Linda Russo’s poetry evolves out of a careful attention to her surroundings: what inhabitation “is” within communities, what resides in language and meaning-making that informs selves-in-place, the to-and-from which moves one/us.  The five pieces that she contributed to rout/e are from “Daynotes on Fields & Forms” (Flittings), published in Meaning to Go to the Origin in Some Way (Shearman Books, 2015). They are planted along the Earth Star Loop of the Rideau Trail, unordered, as one finds them. Katherine Forster  (Wild.Here) helped plant them – with thanks!

The Earth Star Loop of the Rideau Trail is a curvy section of the trail, seeming to twist nearly around on itself before returning to track. The nature of trails – their interruptions and reforming based on species use – underlies my planting of Russo’s poems here. Two tracks shadow each other: one is the Rideau Trail, and the other is an ATV trail that runs parallel to the RT at times, and at others, functions as a linear path behind the RT’s curves. It seems as if different routes have been created for different uses here, non-chronologically and also responsively (e.g. to habitat, season, access, predation); some put into place by human activity, others by the various species that inhabit and cross through these spaces, unimpeded (for the most part) by lot allocations, fence-lines, and Rideau Trail markers.

 

 

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